ukpuru
ukpuru:

mapsontheweb:

How Africa Would Look Like if its Borders Were Defined By Ethnicity and Language. By George Peter Murdock,1959
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Slightly inaccurate map and it doesn’t really give you the details and the context. Many of the languages covering larger areas have a smaller population than some of the languages covering smaller areas so it may look like Africa is ‘babel’, when in reality much of the languages in Northern Nigeria for example are slowly being replaced by Hausa and some of the really tiny ones are spoken by less than 50,000 people. on the other hand Igbo and Yoruba for example (which borders you can hardly see in Nigeria) are spoken by upwards of 30 million people. Also, some of these languages are mutually intelligible, and some of these borders are straight up dialects of the same language broken up for mostly political reasons or because the cartographer read some book that split them up, usually by classifying the language as a language family, sort of like classifying Australian English and Irish English as separate languages under the English language family (hence the mess with Somali).

ukpuru:

mapsontheweb:

How Africa Would Look Like if its Borders Were Defined By Ethnicity and Language. By George Peter Murdock,1959

Read More

Slightly inaccurate map and it doesn’t really give you the details and the context. Many of the languages covering larger areas have a smaller population than some of the languages covering smaller areas so it may look like Africa is ‘babel’, when in reality much of the languages in Northern Nigeria for example are slowly being replaced by Hausa and some of the really tiny ones are spoken by less than 50,000 people. on the other hand Igbo and Yoruba for example (which borders you can hardly see in Nigeria) are spoken by upwards of 30 million people. Also, some of these languages are mutually intelligible, and some of these borders are straight up dialects of the same language broken up for mostly political reasons or because the cartographer read some book that split them up, usually by classifying the language as a language family, sort of like classifying Australian English and Irish English as separate languages under the English language family (hence the mess with Somali).

serenityhartsyou

serenityhartsyou:

polychrome-ink:

Accents - Denice Frohman

"Her tongue can’t lay itself down flat enough for the English language,
It got too much hip, too much bone,
Too much Conga, too much quatro to two step,
Got too many piano keys in between her teeth.
It got too much clave, too much hand clap,
Got too much salsa to sit still,
It’s being anxious, child, trying to make play-doh outta concrete,
English be too neat for her kinda wonderful.”

Beautiful